Fair employment

NonDiscrimination

Georgia Equality’s mission is to advance fairness, safety and opportunity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities and our allies throughout the state. Georgia Equality is dedicated to ensuring LGBT Georgians are protected against discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations.

 

all things being equal logo

Georgia Equality has launched a new video series that features the real stories of Georgians whose lives have been turned upside down because of discrimination they faced in the workplace, simply because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. The series of videos, All Things Being Equal, features emotional stories from hardworking Georgians who experienced discrimination in housing, employment, or public accommodation simply because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

connie picConnie Galloway, Blue Ridge, GA

Jordan Bernard Video Thumb

Jordan Bernard, Walton, GA

Giselle Lawn Video Thumb

Giselle Lawn, Dalton, GA

Have you been discriminated against because of your real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity? Do you have your own story you would like to share? Click here.

Georgia is one of 28 states that have no laws protecting people from discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

Workplace Discrimination:

Many people across our country and across our state assume that it’s already illegal to fire someone or deny them housing or other services simply because they’re LGBT, but that’s not true. There’s no federal law protecting LGBT people from discrimination, and there are no state laws  in Georgia that have explicit LGBT non-discrimination protection.

BUT didn’t the EEOC ruling fix some of that?

In July 2015, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) ruled that Title VII of the 1967 Civil Rights Act includes protection from employment discrimination based on sexual orientation. Previously, the EEOC found that gender identity-based discrimination is also prohibited by Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. The ruling applies to federal claims and will also be used by the EEOC’s offices in Georgia when investigating discrimination claims in the private sector.Georgia Equality encourages individuals who experience discrimination based on their real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity to file a complaint with the EEOC.

Sort of……   Though there is a path forward for those with economic resources to advance legal cases of workplace discrimination  – there haven’t been many rulings to set precedent, some cases are left up to the judge discretion, and would most likely end up in a time-consuming battle; also the EEOC ruling sets no protections for housing or public accommodations.

Georgia Equality believes that only the passage of state-level comprehensive  non-LGBT discrimination policies and legislation will prevent discrimination in workplace, housing, and public accommodations.

Currently, Georgia Equality is committed to the passage of the Fair Employment Practices Act (FEPA), which will provide clear instructions to agencies, supervisors, and employees to prevent discrimination in public employment and ensure proper treatment of all state employees. FEPA would add sexual orientation and gender identity to Chapter 19 of the Georgia state statutes.

Tell Your Legislators: Support the Fair Employment Practices Act! 

Additionally, check your local non-discrimination ordinance to see if it prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.Visit our Workplace Fairness 

Have you been discriminated against because of your real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity? Do you have your own story you would like to share? Click here.


Housing Discrimination:

Georgians can be refused rental or removed from their homes because of their perceived or real gender identity or sexual orientation.

If you believe you have experienced housing discrimination, you should contact the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. You may also file a housing complaint online. Contact your local HUD office for assistance with filing a complaint. 

Additionally, check your local non-discrimination ordinance to see if it prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. 

Have you been discriminated against because of your real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity? Do you have your own story you would like to share? Click here.


Public Accommodations Discrimination:

Be refused service, entry, etc. into a place of public accommodation based on your perceived or real gender identity. Public accommodations are generally defined as entities, both public and private. Examples include retail stores, restaurants, hotels, parks, entertainment venues, as well as educational institutions, recreation facilities and service centers.

Additionally, check your local non-discrimination ordinance to see if it prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

Have you been discriminated against because of your real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity? Do you have your own story you would like to share? Click here.


Discrimination in Prison, Jails, and Detention Centers:

Georgia Equality is dedicated to putting an end to discrimination against LGBT people in Georgia prisons, jails, and detention centers.

If you have experienced discrimination while incarcerated in Georgia, please contact Sarah Geraghty, Managing Attorney of the Impact Litigation Unit at email hidden; JavaScript is required or 404-688-1202.


Implications of Broad Religious Exemption Laws:

Georgia Equality is increasingly concerned about the broad and widespread implications that religions exemption laws have for LGBT Americans. These laws have recently been used as a defense when businesses discriminate against or refuse service to LGBT customers and same-sex couples.
Currently, 43% of LGBT Americans live in one of the 21 states that has broad explicit constitutional or statutory religious exemption laws.

The freedom of religion is one of our most fundamental rights. It’s enshrined in our Constitution and reflected in laws across the land – and it’s not up for debate. In fact, it’s one of the many freedoms that allow each and every American to live their lives to the fullest and advance the common good.

But a new type of bill appearing in state legislatures across the country, often called a “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA), essentially allows individuals to use their religious beliefs to harm others, paving the way for challenges to virtually any law designed to protect all of us from various forms of discrimination. These RFRA bills ultimately create unforeseen consequences and cause real problems for people, governments and businesses.

GA Unites LogoGeorgia Equality is committed to stopping RFRA in Georgia and to advancing polices and laws that advance fairness, safety and opportunity for LGBT Georgians.In January 2015, Georgia Equality launched a historic grassroots campaign with Georgia Unites Against Discrimination to oppose legislation in the Georgia General Assembly that essentially allows individuals to use their religious beliefs to discriminate the LGBT community and others.

 

Tell Your Lawmakers: No Discrimination in Georgia!

For more info – newreport :LGBT Policy Spotlight: State and Federal Religious Exemptions and the LGBT Community

Have you been discriminated against because of your real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity? Do you have your own story you would like to share? Click here.